Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is an FDA-approved and tightly-regulated drug used in the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). Buprenorphine was given the green light for clinical use back in 2002, because it represented an advance in effective Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). Buprenorphine continues to represent that advance, as well as that effectiveness. And it continues to play an integral role in MAT programs.

ALEF also reached out to every local, state and federal addiction-related healthcare overseer in order to receive all the essential certifications and accreditations concerning opioid use disorder treatment. Why? Because we believe it’s imperative that only qualified stakeholders prescribe and administer buprenorphine and other MAT medications. The risks are too high to believe otherwise.

Has substance abuse become a problem with you or your loved one? Has your family been harmed by addiction? Are you one of the many thousands who are suffering through America’s opioid epidemic? Well, then let ALEF help.

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Buprenorphine Myths & Misconceptions


There are many misconceptions about buprenorphine and other advanced opioid dependency treatment options. Too many. Most of the misconceptions spring from rumor, innuendo and simple misinformation.

One of the most prevalent misconceptions is that buprenorphine and other Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) options simply replace one addiction with another. In fact, even some physicians still believe this myth.
But, as the New England Journal of Medicine itself makes clear, addiction isn’t defined by physiological dependence. Addiction is defined by compulsive use of a drug despite its inherent harm. “If relying on a daily medication were addiction,” says the NEJM, “then most patients with chronic health conditions such as diabetes or asthma would be considered addicts.” So no, buprenorphine isn’t a replacement drug; it’s a treatment drug.

Another myth is that abstinence is always best. Yes, abstinence-based treatment models have provided some successes. But those successes are impossible to quantify, let alone prove. In fact, even Alcoholics Anonymous has trouble accurately tabulating its recovery success rate, and it’s the longest-running abstinence-based program in America!

A widely-cited Scottish study though did report an 80% relapse rate after a full year of abstinence. And that hardly qualifies as successful, in anybody’s book. Consequently, MAT shouldn’t be ranked against unreliably-calibrated abstinence-based programs. After all, not everyone benefits from abstinence. And as the above-cited study attests, that includes a whole lot of people.

Other Barriers to Buprenorphine Treatment


Another barrier to successful opioid use disorder treatment is poor access to Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). Decades of research have demonstrated the efficacy of MAT, writes the New England Journal of Medicine. And it’s a “tragic irony” that “well-established” methods exist to successfully treat opioid use disorder, yet people still have difficulty getting to them.

“Nearly 80% of Americans with opioid use disorder don’t receive treatment” (there’s that abominable number again). And until every opioid addict has access to quality opioid addiction treatment there’s little chance we’ll see reduced opioid addiction rates, let alone a reduction in opioid overdoses.
In other words, widespread access to effective opioid addiction treatment won’t just improve the quality of hundreds of thousands of American lives, but it’ll help save hundreds of thousands of American lives too. Just imagine the impact such effective addiction treatment will have on American families and communities.

ALEF & Buprenorphine


ALEF didn’t just stumble upon buprenorphine and other Medication- Assisted Treatment (MAT) options. We first weighed the facts. Then we parsed the evidence. And finally we acknowledged the need. That is to say, we did our research, as thoroughly and as diligently as possible. And we concluded that providing MAT to people in need would not only be beneficial, but that it was absolutely necessary.

ALEF also reached out to every local, state and federal addiction-related healthcare overseer in order to receive all the essential certifications and accreditations concerning opioid use disorder treatment. Why? Because we believe it’s imperative that only qualified stakeholders prescribe and administer buprenorphine and other MAT. The risks are too high to believe otherwise.
We further believe that buprenorphine and other MAT options provide the very best chance at beating opioid addiction, as well as in ending America’s opioid epidemic. And the more Americans who have access to such advanced treatment, the more Americans will be able to get off the addiction merry-go-round and go on to lead fulfilling lives.

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If you or someone you know is experiencing problems with heroin, OxyContin or other opioids, please give us a call. We’d very much like to help.

Buprenorphine - Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Centers